Moooove over, we’ve got cows!

 

Our oldest checking out the cows in the back!

Our oldest checking out the cows in the back!

I sent the above picture to several family and friends on our way home from acquiring our cows.  My brother called me immediately and asked, “Why do you have cows in your van?”.  “How else was I supposed to get them home?”.  We’ve gotten a lot of chuckles from transporting cows in our van and we are chuckling along with you!  One day we may get a truck, but for now our van has served us well.  The calves rode well.  They didn’t even poop or pee on the 90 minute ride home.   We had a tarp down just in case.  Occasionally, we’d hear a moo from a calf, then a “baaaa” response from our one year old.

 

Visiting the farm to pick our calves.

Visiting the farm to pick our calves.

We found these cows on Craig’s list.  They were located in a town about twenty minutes away from Springfield.  We happened to be in Springfield this weekend so we decided to swing by and pick up some cows.  Funny story.  On our way to get calves, I needed to meet up with my cousin Erin to give her a gift for her expectant daughter, Jenna.  We needed cow supplies so we asked to meet at a Tractor Supply store not far from Erin’s house.  Jenna and her boyfriend, Reese, also came to meet us.  When I saw them, I remembered…”Hey, aren’t you a farmer, Reese?!”.  Yes.  Yes he is.  A dairy farmer with over 450 head of dairy cows.  Jackpot!

Reese and Jenna went into the store and helped us determine what things we needed and didn’t need.  Reese was very patient with our newbie questions and helped my hubby maneuvar a gate into the van to keep the cows seperate from the kids.  Erin and Jenna helped chase my little ones around the tractor store while hubby and I soaked up Reese’s knowledge.  Thanks, girls!  Ps.  I can tell Jenna is gonna be an excellent mommy.  She jogged her 9 month pregnant self around the store to keep my toddler safe and out of trouble!

Figuring out how to drink from a bottle.

Figuring out how to drink from a bottle.

These boys were four days old when we got them.  They were born on a dairy farm.  Since they are boys, the dairy farmers don’t keep them.  They get the colostrum and then they are trained to take a bottle.  Then the mommy cows pump out milk for human consumption.  Kinda sad if you think about it!

These guys are too cute.  Seriously.  Even a hamburger or roast  isn’t tempting me to eat them at this point.  They will suckle your finger and let you pet them.  Even their moo is cute.  Let’s hope I get over the cuteness in time for butchering.  In the meantime, we’ve got to focus on keeping them warm and healthy in these frigid temps.

Coming soon….a post on banding the boys.  First, we need the equipment and I’m trying to talk a cattle farmer into coming over to show us how to do it.

Max and Lucy observing their new charges.

Max and Lucy observing their new charges.